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Fullhurst Community College

Pupil Premium review of spending 2014-15

In 2014-15, Fullhurst Community College had 455 students eligible for Pupil Premium.  £935 was received per student, resulting in £425,425 total Pupil Premium received.  The Pupil Premium funding for 2014-15 was spent through four main strategic avenues, all aimed at raising the achievement of students eligible for the Pupil Premium:

  1.  Increase the attainment of students eligible for the Pupil Premium, particularly in English and Maths (£122,589.59)
  2. Ensure the curriculum is appropriate for every student, including those students eligible for the Pupil Premium (£118,822.02)
  3. Increase the enrichment opportunities available to students eligible for the Pupil Premium (£27,392.13)
  4.  Increase pastoral support for students eligible for the Pupil Premium (£156,636.01)

Increase the attainment of students eligible for the Pupil Premium, particularly in English and Maths 

Intervention teachers: The English intervention teacher worked with disadvantaged students in years 10 and 11 on their controlled assessment pieces and also on preparing for their written exam.  This intervention was on a small group basis, and was taught in English lesson time.  The Maths intervention teacher worked with more able disadvantaged students in year 7 on the new types of question which they will face in the reformed GCSEs and also with lower attaining pupils in year 11 with the intention of them making national expected progress in their GCSEs.  Both the English and Maths intervention teachers have a track record of significant value added, and therefore these disadvantaged students were able to benefit from the very best teaching.  These interventions were on a rolling basis, and lasted for a relatively short period of time with each student to maximise efficiency, impact and scope.  The interventions were coordinated by the Assistant Principal.

Interventions in advance of public examinations: Revision conferences for year 11 and year 10 pupils were held at the King Power football stadium, to provide an enriching opportunity for the students to revise in the days before their GCSE exams in English and Maths.  The conferences focused on key topics and exam technique and were facilitated by the students’ class teachers.  In house, the Key Stage 4 pupils also had a revision launch event in February.  This was hosted in school and run by the Senior Leadership Team (SLT) and middle leaders.  Revision breakfasts were held on the morning of all GCSE exams for all subjects.

Resources for intervention: A reprographics budget was set for staff to use for intervention with disadvantaged students.  Published revision guides were given to all year 11 disadvantaged pupils, to aid progress and revision in both English and Maths.

CPD for staff: Attendance for various staff at conferences with an agenda for raising the achievement of disadvantaged students, including: Raising the Achievement of White Working Class Pupils, the National Pupil Premium Conference, and the Leicester Pupil Premium conference hosted by Sir John Dunford.

Data management software: Purchase of SISRA to improve the efficiency of data monitoring of disadvantaged students, to ensure appropriate subsequent interventions are both timely and accurate.

Impact:

  • 57% of students eligible for the Pupil Premium in year 11 achieved A*-C in English.  71% of students eligible for the Pupil Premium in year 11 achieved national expected progress in English, which is in line with the national rate for all students.
  • 56% of students eligible for the Pupil Premium in year 11 achieved A*-C in Maths.  This is an increase of 10% compared to last year. 57% of students eligible for the Pupil Premium in year 11 achieved national expected progress in Maths.  This is an increase of 13% compared to last year.
  • 46% of students eligible for the Pupil Premium in year 11 achieved 5A*-C including English and Math, compared to 40% in 2013-14.  This 46% result is 9% above the national rate for students eligible for the Pupil Premium.
  •  The gap between the percentage of students eligible for the Pupil Premium who achieved 5A*-C including English and Maths and those pupils who were not eligible for the pupils premium closed from 23% to 11%.
  • 48% of students eligible for the Pupil Premium achieved the Basics measure of a A*-C pass in both English and Maths, which is an increase of 6% compared to 2014.
  • 15 out of 19 (79%) students eligible for the Pupil Premium who were taught by the Maths intervention teacher achieved A*-C. 38/41 (93%) students eligible for the Pupil Premium who were taught by the English intervention teacher achieved A*-C.
  •  100% of the disadvantaged students who attended the Maths revision conference at the King Power stadium achieved A*-C.  95% of the disadvantaged students who attended the English revision conference at the King Power stadium achieved A*-C.
  • Across the curriculum, seven subjects raised the attainment of the disadvantaged students compared to 2014. Eight subjects closed the attainment gap between the disadvantaged students and other students, compared to 2014. Nine subjects have raised the progress of disadvantaged students compared to 2014.  12 subjects closed the progress gap between the disadvantaged students and other students, compared to 2014.
  • All Key Stage 3 gaps across English, Maths and Science for years 8 and 9 have closed this year compared to last.  Achievement of disadvantaged students has improved in each case.

Ensure the curriculum is appropriate for every child, including those students eligible for the Pupil Premium 

Teachers of vocational studies and support staff: Students were able to engage in a Hair and Beauty course and qualification and a Land Management qualification on the Fullhurst farm.  The Hair and Beauty course was delivered by an industry expert and allowed the disadvantaged students to partake and achieve in a course which suited their personal interests and skills.  The Land Management course was also delivered on a weekly basis and allowed the disadvantaged students to work with an industry expert, on the Fullhurst farm and later prompted an opportunity for the students to work on the teacher’s own business site.  In addition, disadvantaged students were given the opportunity to experience extra-curricular activities such as horse riding and mountain biking.

Alternative Provisions Co-ordinator:  Disadvantaged students on alternative provisions had their academic achievement managed and overseen by the college’s own Alternative Provisions Co-ordinator.  The Co-ordinator liaised with the external providers on behalf of the students, tracked their achievement, attendance etc. and ensured a positive home-college relationship with regards to these students.

Careers Education, Information, Advice and Guidance (CEIAG) Officer:  Met with all year 11 disadvantaged students on a one-to-one basis to discuss destination options and met with all year 9 disadvantaged students on a one-to-one basis to discuss their options choices.  The CEIAG Officer contributed to the college’s assembly programme, graduate programme and tutor team programme.  The CEIAG Officer also facilitated several lunchtime information sessions, prioritised towards disadvantaged students, on different career pathways. These sessions ran throughout the academic year.  Disadvantaged students were given mock interview practise with employers from the local community, in advance of their college interviews and the CEIAG Officer made herself available throughout the year to give personalised advice to all disadvantaged students in all year groups.  The more able disadvantaged students in year 11 were given a programme of meetings to help prepare them for applying and interviewing for the local Sixth Form College.

Year six transition: Much work was done to ensure that the disadvantaged students that joined the college from our feeder schools had a smooth transition.  Each of the families of the disadvantaged students were telephoned in advance of them starting at the college.  The Deputy Principal, Head of Key Stage 3 and Head of Year 7 visited all of the feeder primary schools in the Summer Term, to speak with the teachers of the disadvantaged students.  In addition, many of the curriculum areas invited cohorts of year 6 disadvantaged pupils into the college, including weekly Maths booster classes for more able disadvantaged pupils from three feeder primary schools, Pere Noel celebration events at Christmas and Languages Days (involving over 300 pupils from feeder primary schools) hosted by the MFL faculty, and also all of the main feeder primary schools had their own sports days on the college field.

Impact:

  • 100% of students eligible for the Pupil Premium in year 10 took part in a one week work experience placement.
  • A record number of disadvantaged students from the school enrolled at a sixth form for further study after completing year 11.
  • In year 7, students had a smooth transition from primary school: 84% of students eligible for the Pupil Premium ended the year on target in English, 78% in Maths and 79% in Science.

Increase the enrichment opportunities available to students eligible for the Pupil Premium 

Curriculum appropriate educational visits: Faculties were able to bid for funding to subsidise the price of funding to take disadvantaged students on educational visits.  These visits included trips to the Curve Theatre in Leicester, the London Eye, National History Museum and the Houses of Parliament and Bletchley Park.

Work experience placements: All year 10 disadvantaged students were able to spend a week’s work experience in an industry sector which was of interest to them. The placements were sourced for the students after one-to-one interviews, which they had with the Careers Officer, and priority was given to the disadvantaged students over the non-disadvantaged.

Educational planners: All of the Key Stage 3 disadvantaged students were given educational planners at the start of the academic year.  The planners were designed by one of the college’s own teachers, to make them effective for the needs of the disadvantaged students in the college.  The front cover for the planners was designed by a disadvantaged student in Key Stage 3.  All of the Key Stage 4 disadvantaged students were given academic diaries at the start of the academic year. The students were allowed to choose their own diary, to give them some ownership of them, and the diaries were integrated into the teaching and learning in lessons by the mentoring given to disadvantaged students by the Academic Mentor and also the students’ teachers and form tutors.

Self-study facilities: The Graduate Lounge was run on a Tuesday and Thursday after college for Key Stage 4 pupils, and was directly aimed at disadvantaged students. Laptops and study resources were provided, as were refreshments.  Each week, the Academic Mentor, the Careers Officer and the students’ subject teachers were in attendance to facilitate additional study. In the Spring and Summer terms, a programme of Period 6 lessons were taught to students.  These sessions either revised material previously taught in lessons, or covered additional material.  Period 6 sessions were also run in the core subjects for Key Stage 3 students, as were homework clubs at lunchtimes.

Rewards trips and incentives for students: Students who met set behaviour criteria were allowed to attend rewards trips at the end of the academic year, which were subsidised for disadvantaged students.  Throughout the year, the Vivos rewards system was employed with all disadvantaged students in the school. Attendance incentives for disadvantaged students were used in each of the six half terms, with prizes given on the last day of each half term.

Impact:

  • All of the above achievement data, in particular the raising of the achievement of disadvantaged students and the narrowing of the gap between students eligible for the Pupil Premium and those students who are not across all year groups, was facilitated by the increased enrichment opportunities available to students eligible for the Pupil Premium.
  • 100% of students eligible for the Pupil Premium in year 10 took part in a one week work experience placement.
  •  On average, 56 disadvantaged students attended the Graduate Lounge/Period 6 each week. Of the disadvantaged students in year 11 who had over 75% attendance at the Graduate Lounge, 92% of them achieved 5A*-C including English and Maths.

Increase pastoral support for students eligible for the Pupil Premium 

Academic Mentor: The Academic Mentor worked primarily with Key Stage 4 disadvantaged students to provide advice and guidance with regards to what the students needed to do to improve their general academic performance.  This included meeting the students on a one-to-one basis, supporting in some lessons, being the link person between pupil / teachers / parents and providing guidance to the students on revision and homework.  The Academic Mentor also was in charge of the Graduate Lounge.

Behaviour Mentor, Inclusion Manager, Family Liaison Officer, Pastoral Administrators: All of these members of staff worked somewhat behind the scenes to ensure that the students had limited barriers to learning when they were in lessons.  The disadvantaged students all faced different barriers to learning over the course of the year, and these members of staff were able to help address them to facilitate at least good academic progress over time for the disadvantaged students.

Curriculum Level 3 Teaching Assistants: All curriculum Teaching Assistants were given the opportunity to train to the Level 3 standard.  This meant that their effectiveness in raising the achievement of disadvantaged students across the curriculum was increased. Curriculum Teaching Assistants were able to run small group interventions with disadvantaged students, as directed by faculty Standards and Progress Leaders.  When short term cover was required, the level 3 Teaching Assistants were able to teach the class, often in lessons on which they supported anyway, which meant that disadvantaged learners benefited from not having their learning disrupted by the absence of their teacher.

Telephone package: The package allowed Heads of Year, the Education Welfare Officer (EWO) and other members of staff to contact home, to multiple students at once if necessary, with ease.  This helped with the attendance of the disadvantaged cohorts of students but also with college-home relationships and getting information home to parents about academic interventions that their children needed to attend etc.

Counselling service: Disadvantaged students from all year groups had the facility of speaking to a professional counsellor.  This could be setup by the SENCo, the Heads of Year and the Academic / Behaviour Mentors.  The disadvantaged students benefited from being able to talk to someone from outside of school, to allow them to achieve well with their learning in the classroom.

Impact:

  • The work of the Academic Mentor contributed to all of the headline threshold measures for students eligible for the Pupil Premium being above the national level for disadvantaged students, and the closing of the gap for these same measures.
  •  The work of the curriculum Teaching Assistants contributed to: seven subjects raising the attainment of the disadvantaged students compared to 2014; eight subjects closed the attainment gap between the disadvantaged students and the other pupils, compared to 2014; nine subjects are raising the progress of the disadvantaged students compared to 2014 and 12 subjects closing the progress gap between the disadvantaged students and the other students, compared to 2014.  Furthermore, the curriculum Teaching Assistants contributed to improvements in the achievement of students in Key Stage 3, including gaps across English, Maths and Science for years 8 and 9 closing this year compared to last (with achievement of disadvantaged students improving in each case).

Fullhurst Community College

Fullhurst Community College
Imperial Avenue
Leicester
LE3 1AH

tel: 0116 282 4326
fax: 0116 282 5781
email: office@fullhurst.leicester.sch.uk